Protesters Want More Security In North East

Dr. Esther Mangzha, the spokesperson for the Southern Borno and Northern Adamawa  Peoples Association on Chibok School  Girls

Dr. Esther Mangzha, the spokesperson for the Southern Borno and Northern Adamawa  Peoples Association on Chibok School  Girls, has called for more security presence in the areas.

Mangzha made the appeal at the end of a three-day prayer organised by the group for the release of the abducted Chibok school girls in Abuja on Wednesday.

She urged the Federal Government to provide adequate security in the areas affected by insurgency.

“Today is 100 days after the Chibok schools girls were abducted by the Boko Haram militants and we are lamenting that since these 100 days we have not seen our children.

“And we want to use this prayer to seek God’s intervention for the release of the girls.

“We are further using this forum to tell President Goodluck Jonathan  and indeed Nigerians, that we are in trouble and need their assistance’’, she said.

She said that when members of the Boko Haram attack villages in the areas, they kill people, cart away food, animals and even medicines from hospitals.

Mangzha, who praised National Emergency Management Agency for assisting people affected by insurgency, however, said more assistance was needed in the areas.

She expressed concern that the insurgents had remained faceless and not ready to negotiate.

Mangzha said schools and other economic activities had been affected as most people had deserted the area.

Amina Aliyu, spokesperson for the Concerned Mothers in Chibok, condemned the attack by insurgents adding that it was hindering girls from attending schools.

Aliyu called on President Jonathan to intensify efforts for the rescue and return of the girls to their parents and the northeast in general.

She said the activities of the Boko Haram insurgents were evil and not Islamic as the religion preaches peace adding that the insurgents were the haram.

Mr Sunday Dika a concerned Nigerian on Chibok, told the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) that agriculture had also been affected by the insurgency.

He said fishermen and farmers could not carry out their activieties due insecurity in the area.

“Homes are no longer safe as the people do not know the hour or the time the insurgents will strike’’, he said.

Some residents of the Federal Capital Territory urged dialogue between the government and the insurgents for the release of the girls. 

Kelechi Eze, a business man, said terrorism was not restricted to Nigeria alone, as other countries of the world were also experiencing insurgency.

He urged the federal government to mobilise more security agents to the affected areas.

Eze said government should increase international training of security personnel on insurgency.

“Let us not only rely on our own mechanisms, the security operatives should seek international ideas that can help us to get these girls out alive’’, he said. 

A cleric, Success Adagbo, urged the government and all Nigerians to continue to seek God’s intervention for the release of the girls.

Mrs Chinelo Ejiofor, a banker, frowned at government’s late meeting with the parents of the Chibok girls.

Ejiofor advised government to compensate the parents of the girls who died in the forest.

Ejike Ibe, a business man, urged government to mobilise security and attack the insurgents in the Sambisa forest.

He, however, said the girls should be rescued alive.

Mr Innocent Magaji, a Human Rights Activist and Lawyer, urged the government not to relent in efforts to release the girls.

“What we need now is a kind of guerrilla war-fare, because if you observe, these people are not ready to negotiate, we should go full force.

“Government should be sure about what it is doing before using combat measures to release the Chibok girls’’, he said