Osun Govt, Students At Loggerheads Over College Merger

Osun Govt, Students At Loggerheads Over College Merger

Patrick Aigbokhan
Students of the Osun State College of Education, Ila Orangun, have drawn a bottle line between the institution and the Osun State Government under the watch of Mr. Rauf Aregbesola over an alleged planned merger of the college with another state owned College of Education in Ilesa.
The State government had indicated a proposed plan to merge the college with another state owned College of Education in the state.
On getting information about the merger, the students frowned at the developmemt, warning Governor Aregbesola against going ahead with the plan.
The students vowed that they would resist the merger policy of the government of the state with everything they had.
As part of moves to demonstrate their opposition to the proposed meger by the state government, the students on Monday staged a fresh protest over the alleged planned merger.
During the protest action, the college students stormed the palace of the Orangun of Ila, Oba Wahab Oyedotun, where people of the community were holding a meeting to deliberate on the alleged plan by Governor Rauf Aregbesola to merge the college with the one in Ilesa.
Armed with placards with various inscriptions, the disgruntled students expresed total displeasure over the governmsnt’s decision, ragging that they would oppose the government till it changed its decision over the college.
Attempts to calm the students against further actions almost suffered setback as they confronted the issue headlong wilth desperation.
Responding to the situation, Mr. Yemi Adeoye, Secretary of Ila Orangun Community, said the people of the town had resolved that the status of the college should be allowed to remain the way it is.
It was argued that the restructuring would lead to reduction of academic programmes and population of the institution which was established in 1979.
According to Adeoye, the restructuring would leave the college with just two academic programmes, which would affect the economy of the town whose residents depended on the college with 15,000 students for their source of income.