Nigeria Needs Whistle-Blowing Policy For Against Boko Haram

Nigeria Needs Whistle-Blowing Policy For Against Boko Haram
Chris Steven, Abuja
The Northern Inter-Faith and Religious Organisation for Peace has canvassed for the adoption of whistle-blowing policy to exterminate the Boko Haram terrorist.
‎Bishop Edward Chanami‎  made the call on Tuesday in Abuja while addressing press briefing on whistle-blowing on suicide bombers and forty days prayer for the capture of Abubakar Shekau.‎
“We have observed with concern the recent string of events in which the Boko Haram terrorists that were taking flight upon their resounding defeat in Camp Zero of Sambisa Forest are attempting to re-constitute themselves into threats to the rest of us.
They have mounted attacks that in their own expectations are spectacular. With the benefit of what we know, the attacks are just a fraction of the many plots to create terror since the military regularly abort their evil plots before fruition.”‎ He said
“These successes in thwarting Boko Haram attacks before they occur are the products of painstaking intelligence gathering. It is logical to assume that greater success would be recorded when citizens volunteer information about Boko Haram terrorists as their own contributions towards making the country safe for all peace-loving citizens.
The war as being prosecuted by the Nigerian military has had its ups and downs moments but this should not detract from the collective desire of the majority of citizens to see good triumph over evil. Even as we continue to intercede for and on behalf of God’s children, we have found it imperative time and time again that our faith must be matched with actions, hence our occasional intervention to give context and direction when necessary. 
It is for this reason that we are revisiting the Whistleblowers Policy of the Military in the counter-terrorism war. We recall that the Nigerian Army, not long ago offered N500,000 to some whistleblowers as reward for providing information about suicide bombers. This practice has been in place for some time but it appears Nigerians are not tapping into it as a way helping to make their own communities secured and safer. ‎
The introduction of whistleblowing in the counter insurgency operations in the north east is no doubt a follow up to the order by the Acting President redeploying the entire military architecture of the country to the north east to confront the new wave of terrorism.
Our appeal however is that the military should consider varying the rewards for whistleblowing. Fear of retribution from the terrorists could be holding back some citizens that have vital information. To this end, we suggest that the reward for certain level of whistleblowing should include offer of relocation and provision of new identities under a whistleblower protection programme.
This would not only instill confidence in volunteering information but will encourage those that are in doubt to step forward. “‎