Climate Change: Nigeria, UK Launch Nigeria Energy Calculator 2050

Climate Change: Nigeria, UK Launch Nigeria Energy Calculator 2050

Chris Steven, Abuja

As threats posed by effects of climate change to human existence continue to manifest across the globe, Nigerian government and United Kingdom have taken a step further to mitigate the effects of green house emission with the launch of Nigeria Energy Calculator 2050.

Speaking at the  launch of the Official Nigeria Energy Calculator 2050 in Abuja at the residence of the British High Commissioner to Nigeria,  the UK Foreign Secretary’s Special Representative for Climate Change,  Sir David King, explained that the calculator was an invaluable tool for generating evidence to support intelligent policy making around energy issues.

He said the project was a great example of how the UK continues to  lend support and expertise to help Nigeria address the challenge of climate change.

“I am delighted to be in Abuja today to launch the Nigeria Energy Calculator and promote the upcoming UN Conference on Climate Change.

We welcome the progress Nigeria has made so far on the Nigeria Energy calculator, which was officially launched today.” He said

The calculator, according to him,  is an invaluable tool for generating evidence to support intelligent policy making around energy issues, noting that the project is a great example of how the UK continues to lend support and expertise to help Nigeria address the challenge of climate change.

Sir King noted that the forthcoming UN Conference on Climate Change in Paris, France later in the year will be a crucial milestone in delivering a global answer to rising global temperatures.

“The UK is committed to working with our partners to ensure that the conference delivers a strong and legally binding international agreement.

Nigeria has an important role to play at the conference, as a developing economy and as a key player in the Africa Group where it can use its influence to help form a consensus amongst its neighbours.

The UK is ready to work with Nigeria and others to help ensure that when world leaders meet in Paris a strong and legally binding agreement is achieved. I am also looking forward to seeing the progress Nigeria has made in delivering greener power and moving away from generator dependence.” He added

Speaking also on the calculator, Permanent Secretary, Federal Ministry of Environment, Hajia Nana Fatimah Mede said the launch of the calculator was timely as Nigeria ranks sixth among countries that are vulnerable to the impacts of climate change.

Her words: “We do not have the needed funding to take on some programmes that will help to mitigate these and help us adapt. We do not have the capacity we need to build capacity, institutional capacity, technology transfer that will help us take steps to make sure that the impact from climate change is reduced and curtailed because nobody knows what it would be.”

It would help us to measure the emission, which is the greenhouse gases that are being emitted so that once we can measure; we know what we are doing.

“So, this calculator will help us to begin to see the steps taken starting from everything we do from generators, cars, even the bulbs, everything we use in the house. So let it will us know what we are putting out there and to be able to prepare and mitigate.”

Director General of Energy Commission of Nigeria (ECN), Professor Eli Jidere Bala said the Commission would work with all stakeholders including those in the academic to domesticate the tool towards gathering relevant climate information for policy making.

He said the tool would help the federal government to project into the future and take precautionary measures when taking any policy.

The Nigeria energy calculator, is a joint project between the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) and the Energy Commission of Nigeria (ECN).

The calculator is a web tool which forecasts energy supply, energy demand and carbon dioxide emissions in Nigeria for the next 35 years, based on a range of user-variable inputs. The results it produces can be used as evidence in developing new energy and climate change policies.